Post-acute Withdrawal–Why The Quick Fixes Don’t Work

One of the biggest differences between addiction and sobriety is that truly sober people are able to accept pleasure’s natural ebb and flow.

As much as we might like to have it otherwise, healthy pleasure isn’t constant. Pleasure is the body’s way of rewarding us for doing things that benefit survival of our offspring and ourselves. When pleasure becomes the norm, rather than the reward, the system breaks down. We begin to pursue pleasure for its own sake, to the neglect of nature’s original intentions. Continue reading “Post-acute Withdrawal–Why The Quick Fixes Don’t Work”

It works, IF….

I just celebrated my 28th year sober from alcohol and drugs.  I write that only to indicate that I know something about this thing we call “recovery”, even if I haven’t done it perfectly.

Over the years I’ve heard and read many times that AA and the other 12-step programs don’t really work very well; that they are effective for only a relatively small percentage of people; that the statistics show — blah, blah, blah.  Putting aside the fact that since those programs don’t keep statistics (So from whence came that so-called data?), I’d have to say that I agree with them, but only with a major qualification. Continue reading “It works, IF….”

Addiction is a disease, and we should treat it like one

Ted Talk: Addiction is a disease and we should treat it like one.

 

Dental Pain Isn’t the End Of The World

giraffe-tongueI just had a tooth pulled.  It was a simple extraction: took about 2 minutes (really), including the cleanup of the socket (eeeeew!).  Never felt a thing.  

Afterward the dentist gave me all the standard instructions, including his recommendations for analgesics if needed, and said if I needed something stronger to give him a call.  I explained that I’m in recovery and don’t do drugs, but that I’d gotten through abscesses before with nothing but ibuprofen and I was sure I’d be okay. Continue reading “Dental Pain Isn’t the End Of The World”

A group of middle-aged whites in the U.S. is dying at a startling rate

The mortality rate for white men and women ages 45-54 with less than a college education increased markedly between 1999 and 2013, most likely because of problems with legal and illegal drugs, alcohol and suicide, the researchers concluded. Before then, death rates for that group dropped steadily, and at a faster pace.

An increase in the mortality rate for any large demographic group in an advanced nation has been virtually unheard of in recent decades, with the exception of Russian men after the collapse of the Soviet Union. MORE…

Addiction News

College students say prescription stimulants easy to find on campus

Posted: 16 Oct 2015 08:56 AM PDT

Seven out of 10 college students say it is somewhat or very easy to obtain controlled stimulants without a prescription, according to a new survey conducted on eight US campuses.

Nicotine gives brain more codeine relief, risk of addiction

Posted: 16 Oct 2015 08:55 AM PDT

Nicotine use over time increases the speed that codeine is converted into morphine within the brain, by increasing the amount of a specific enzyme, according to new research in rat models. It appears smokers’ brains are being primed for a bigger buzz from this common pain killer — which could put them at a higher risk for addiction, and possibly even overdose. These findings are part a new way of seeing the brain’s role when it comes to drugs and toxins.

Brief interventions in primary care clinics could curb patients’ drug use

Posted: 16 Oct 2015 06:41 AM PDT

A few minutes of counseling in a primary care setting could be an effective tool in steering people away from risky drug use, and possibly full-fledged addiction, a new report suggests. The researchers found that this sort of intervention helped patients reduce their risky drug use by one-third.

Excessive alcohol use continues to be drain on American economy

Posted: 16 Oct 2015 05:48 AM PDT

Excessive alcohol use continues to be a drain on the American economy, according to a study. Excessive drinking cost the U.S. $249 billion in 2010, or $2.05 per drink, a significant increase from $223.5 billion, or $1.90 per drink, in 2006. Most of these costs were due to reduced workplace productivity, crime, and the cost of treating people for health problems caused by excessive drinking.