Some Thoughts About Dealing With Crisis

Five years ago, almost to the minute when I’m writing this, I had a life-changing experience. It doesn’t matter what it was, but trust me, it was one of those moments that you never forget. Continue reading “Some Thoughts About Dealing With Crisis”

Confirmation Bias

We unconsciously seek and evaluate information that supports our own ideas. This is called confirmation bias. For example, we tend to look for news from sources that lean in our direction politically. Thus, what we see and hear confirms our own belief system. We are (usually) either not exposed to opposing views that might give us a more balanced understanding of the issues, or we choose to discount them. It has been shown through dozens of studies that reason bows to belief in virtually all cases. This is most noticeably true in the cases of politics and religion, but confirmation biases exist in every area where a position and/or opinion needs support.  This leads to a worldview that supports the idea of them and us. “They” are so messed up! “We,” on the other hand, are the souls of ethical behavior and correct thinking. Continue reading “Confirmation Bias”

Contempt: We Pay The Price

Contempt restricts intellect, tolerance and appreciation. It closes us off from what others have to offer and stifles our enjoyment of the variety our lives present.

Whose idea was it, anyway?

Sometimes we have false goals:

“I should be married with children by the time I’m ____!”
“I have to get my degree,” (even though I don’t really need it to open the flower shop that’s my secret dream).

Are those goals ours, or are they someone else’s goals for us that we are trying to fulfill? How many other things in our lives fall into that category of fulfilling someone else’s wants?

If our life template doesn’t seem to fit, maybe it’s time to check the measurements.

 

On Being Judgmental

“First one must change. I first watch myself, check myself, then expect changes from others.”
~ Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama

Note: More quotes on the interwebs are incorrectly attributed to The Dalai Lama and Albert Einstein than any other two people. I always check to be sure they're genuine.

Integrity

Am I doing the “next right thing” as consistently as possible, without expecting recognition or reward, or do I expect to be praised and paid in some way for everything I do?

Intentions are important, because they tell us much about ourselves. Am I a needy person who constantly seeks approval? Am I always looking for ways to make myself look important–to improve my image? (In whose eyes?) Is doing good things part of my addict con job, or am I cultivating the humility and good character that come from plodding on without glory, with only the satisfaction that comes from knowing that I’m doing the best I can?

It’s worth thinking about. I’m the only one who can know my true intentions, and so I’m the only one who can make changes. Or not.

Integrity is doing the right thing when no one is watching.