Tag Archives: addiction and recovery

Trust Your Gut – Part 2

Intuition vs. Logic

“I believe in intuition and inspiration. At times I feel certain I am right while not knowing the reason why.” Do you know who said that? It was none other than Albert Einstein.

 “Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect.” Any guesses? It was Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs.

Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs both attributed their extraordinary success to this personality trait of listening to their intuition. They have both been stated saying “it has never let me down.”

The article linked below was written with personal defense in mind. At first it might not seem germane to recovery — but think about it! What’s more pertinent to the recovery process than personal defense? Surely no one else is going to do it for us — keep us out of slippery places, warn us of situations or thinking that might lead us down the wrong path, give us that feeling between our shoulder blades that lets us know that we’re maybe in something that’s over our heads?

As I wrote in the previous post, our gut is one of our most powerful tools, if we listen to what it’s trying to tell us. But addicts seem to be more interested in what we want to do (I want, I want, I WANT!), rather than paying attention to creepy feelings. The remarks in the article below can (and do) easily apply to many issues in our lives, from the urge to tell that fib to the feeling that someone may have messed with our drink. Read it and think about all the possible applications of “gut feelings.”

Oh…and don’t let the source of the article offend you. Shooting messengers is almost never good policy.

https://tinyurl.com/2fxpdt6q

About Me

I was born at an early age, drank alcoholically from the first beer, used recreational drugs (and some not so recreational), eventually reaching the point where none of that stuff was fun any more. It was just work: work to stay supplied, work to juggle my reality and everyone else’s, work to keep people from finding out (I thought), work to simply live — and life sucked. Somewhere along the line I married another addict, and for several years that sucked too. There was no question in my mind that I had a problem, I just didn’t know the problem had a solution.

Finally, I was unable to keep all the balls in the air, and the world came tumbling down in the form of foreclosures, evictions, pawn shops, beat up old cars with all sorts of garbage on the dashboard, and eventually professional disgrace and the threat of losing my job.

Like many men, the job thing was the last straw for me. I knew that my wife and I would be living behind the dumpster at the Golden Arches within days, and I agreed to go into a residential treatment program. Two weeks later, my wife entered treatment at the same facility. The rest is not history, it’s more of a miracle.

Now, thirty-odd years later, I’ve had the opportunity to make most of the mistakes that folks can make in recovery, apart from actually picking up a drink or a drug.* Among other things, I’ve learned that relapse occurs before we pick up — that actually using just makes it official. I’ve worked in the recovery field. I’ve had the good sense to realize that it wasn’t for me, and got out of it. I’ve hit a lot of meetings, talked to a lot of alcoholics and addicts, and learned some of what they had to teach me.

And my wife? She got her degree in Social Work, Magna Cum Laude, at age 50, and her C.A.P. (Certified Addiction Professional — with international endorsement) a few years later. She’s also a Certified Mental Health Professional. She has worked in the field for many thousands of contact hours, and specializes in addiction (of course) and grief therapy.

We should both be dead, but we made it out the other side.

Please hang around. If you feel like reading my stuff, fine, but whatever you do, keep coming back. Don’t die. Please!

Yours in recovery,
Bill

*I use alcoholism, addiction, alcoholic and addict interchangeably. They’re the same disease, and we’re all just bozos on the same bus. That’s the first thing you need to learn.

Thought for the day :

I have neither the right, nor the responsibility, to judge others. Depending on my attitude I can view newcomers to [my fellowships], family members and friends as menaces or as teachers. When I think of some of my past judgments, it is clear how my self-righteousness caused me spiritual harm. ~ Daily Reflections, Hazelden

Recovery Basics

Don’t use; go to meetings; get a sponsor; work the steps, carry the message. These are the basics of recovery in the 12-step programs. If we say “don’t act out,” we can include all variations of addictive behaviors, and if we broaden our definitions to include other successful recovery programs, these are the basics of recovery, period. Continue reading