Thought for the day 11/13-14/17

“Don’t allow yourself to be heard any longer complaining about…life, not even with your own ears!”

Marcus Aurelius, ‘Meditations’, 8.9

“The basic thing is that everyone wants happiness, no one wants suffering. And happiness mainly comes from our own attitude, rather than from external factors.”

Tenzin Gyatso (The real Dalai Lama)

Thoughts…

smileyThe essence of a belief is the establishment of a habit.  
Have I come to believe yet?

Addiction is trading away the future to feel better today.  
How did that work out for me?

If my addictions had made me happy, I wouldn’t be in recovery.  
Do I find myself surprised at some of the things that make me happy now?

“The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven”  ~ John Milton, Paradise Lost
How is my head treating me today?  How am I treating my head?

Do You Want To Be Right, Or Would You Rather Be Happy?

Resentments are the poison that we drink, and then wait for the other person to die.
– Anonymous

Some of the truest words you’ll ever read.

Think about it.  Think about that terrible thing that (insert name here) did to you back in the long-ago.  Think about how bad it made you feel.  Think about how you’d like to get back at (**),  how you’d like to tell them off in words that would make them shrivel and leave them with nothing at all to say.

How often do those thoughts come into your head?  Once a week?  Once a day? Continue reading “Do You Want To Be Right, Or Would You Rather Be Happy?”

Recapturing Our Sense Of Fun

by Bill

As our addictions progressed, we lost our zest for life. Some of us, depending on our childhood experiences, didn’t have much to begin with, but for sure as our need to feed our addictions at all cost became greater, we began to focus on that instead of the natural joys of living. We reached a point where we had no energy, felt sluggish, were unable to work up any enthusiasm unless we were high (sometimes).

We became self-absorbed. We withdrew from others when their attitudes toward our using began to threaten our disease. We became self-centered, and often convinced ourselves that we didn’t need other people in our lives. Eventually we denied ourselves one of the basic things that makes us human – – our sense of community and belonging.

Successful recovery demands that we overcome these feelings of isolation and unworthiness. The best place to do that is in our recovery groups, where people understand us and what we’ve gone through. Although those not in recovery may mean well, they don’t “get it” most of the time, and indeed will in most cases try to pass along to us a world view that we are not yet equipped to understand.

Gradually we begin to trust the people in our groups. As that trust increases, we begin to let them know who we really are, and as we do that we become able to let the child inside come out to play sometimes. Without the trust that we build with our peers in recovery, learning to appreciate and enjoy the world at large is difficult, if not impossible. Once we become convinced that we don’t have to check for a sniper behind every bush, we can relax and enjoy our walk through the park.

Happiness

Gautama Buddha discussed the role of the mind in the pursuit of happiness through the practice of the eightfold path. According to Buddha, “Mind is the forerunner of states of existence. Mind is chief, and (those states) are caused by the mind. If one speaks and acts with a pure mind, surely happiness will follow like one’s own shadow!” In Buddhism, the third of the Four Noble Truths states “to eliminate suffering, eliminate craving”, thus establishing happiness as beyond material and emotional possession and attainable only through an attentive practice leading to extinguishing of craving and aversion….

Happiness